Tag Archives: webfiction

JukePop Serial Review: Silas Merryweather and the Bottomless Sky

Silas Merryweather and the Bottomless Sky is a story written by Joan Albright that introduces the reader to a kid named Silas that’s afraid of heights. This would be a mild inconvenience to the average person but in this world it becomes slightly more horrible. You see, Silas lives on a floating island.

Surefire ways to hook a reader include giving them a flash of action, introducing them to interesting characters, and creating a world that’s easy to fall into. Silas Merryweather and the Bottomless Sky did all three and made me fall right away. It’s incredibly engaging with its quick pace and a good sense of adventure from the start.

It begins with two distinct characters taking on an everyday task that is anything but ordinary: checking the links of chains that tether floating islands. That alone is a lovely idea: Floating islands in a world without a bottom or top? Chains that somehow keep everything knitted together? Sky-skiffs and magnet guns that allow this world’s people to zoom through the air? I love the ideas and the mental images that come with this story and the two characters that first inhabit its lofty islands. Silas and the intractable Windy are at odds since the first page yet seem destined to crash together repeatedly.

Solid writing makes for an easy read through succinct descriptions and entertaining banter, providing a story that really feeds the imagination without bogging down a reader. At times I do wish there was something more in the way of description. I end up wanting to know more about the world than is offered. Understandably you want the reader to be hooked into learning more, but then it has to be a balance with gradual sips of the setting’s Kool-Aid. Though caught up to the serial I have yet to get as many answers as I’d like, but maybe that’s just me being impatient.

Additionally, the story tends toward character development in a way that makes me think of cartoons and Disney sitcoms. Reading Silas makes me picture something like a Ghibli film where the people are all characters in their own right, not just people but unique textures in themselves. That’s not always a bad thing but I do end up wanting more from the people as I don’t have the rich visuals to complete the narrative for me. Instead of feeling real the inhabitants come off as just a tad shallow. Some of the adults especially remind me of stereotypes rather than parts of the world and that makes it harder for me to care what they think or say. Their weakness reduces the main characters a bit and reduces their struggles as well.

That said, it’s still a really enjoyable read and there weren’t even any typos or errors that I had noticed.

One star for clarity and readability, one for originality and interest, half for setting and cohesiveness, half for character development, and one star for enjoyability.

 

Any thoughts or disputes? Please let me know!

-J.A.

Before The Fan

Flash Fiction
J.A. Waters
995 Words

“There’s too much trash in this city.”

Jacob leaned over the roof’s edge, peering down into the alley below, “You’re right, Desconci is considered fifth in the world for street refuse.” He grabbed his helmet and twisted the seal tight for the thousandth time that evening.

Gina counted her steps backward, five from the edge. She glanced at Jake with a scowl, “Why are you even working in this field?” Her body raced forward on its three cybernetic legs. The mid-foot seated on the building’s seam, snapping the woman into space.

Watching a bum burrowing in foil wrapping and trash, Jake glanced up in time to see his partner tiptoe into a perfect landing a roof over, “What do you mean?” He jogged backwards, boots whirring as they picked up a preset. Sprinting for the gap, there was a whirl of air and the thud of miniature impact motors striking the rooftop.

Cybernetic hips cocked to one side, Gi watched the unaltered human’s rolling landing. One tumble and the man was up onto his feet and ready. Gina wasn’t sure Jacob had to roll; she thought he just enjoyed flair, “You’re smart: a fucking genius. Why are you up here following me around rooftops as a copper?”

“Well, I’m not sure why I follow you around rooftops.” Jake walked to the next edge, peering into a street crowded with traffic and people. Road-windows to the subway flashed as trains sped beneath the world. The corporal grinned, “But I like being a cop. I like doing something good; catching shit before it hits the fan. Having a superior that walks on buildings makes it more interesting.” His suit started beeping.

The Sergeant smirked, humorless and bitter, “Are you coming on to me? I know some of you guys like women with nice legs…” Her suit’s arm-display blinked on, message playing across empty air, “All units on alert. Great. Two blocks over, someone’s making a land dispute.” The display closed with a wave of her hand.

Jacob tapped at the air for further queries, arm-display beeping as searches filled the queue, “Land dispute? The guy’s about to blow up a building!” His gaze snapped after his leader’s retreating form zipping down onto the street. A quick gesture saved his queries, and he did a quick double stomp that set his boots into a ticking frenzy of preparation. A curse slipped under his breath as he dashed headlong over the roof’s end. He aimed for the top of a car.

The boots sounded like screeching tires as they gripped the vehicle. Jake spread his arms wide in the landing, then disengaged his shoes with a wiggling big toe. With the driver’s help (they’d slammed the brakes) he arced in a leap over several cars and hit the sidewalk sprinting. A man careened on a tricked-out electroBMX and decided for a quick wall-ride up a building to avoid panicking pedestrians.

Those same pedestrians barreled away from the swathe-cutting knife that was a running Desconci P.E. Policy Enforcers wore practical suits of armor weighing as much as a small motorcycle with several times the power. Diving out of the way was a sensible reaction. Jacob’s helmet blared with shoulders flashing as he trailed behind his superior’s nimble form. Ahead, she sprang off light poles and landed on window ledges. Her feet never touched the ground. Jake muttered into his mic, “You’d be pretty fucking great at Don’t Touch the Lava.”

With one final snap of cybernetic muscle, Gina twisted through the air and barreled into a man wielding a PulseHammer. The advanced jackhammer went flying and the man’s left arm snapped at the elbow. Bone ripped through skin and cloth on his upper arm. Gi’s three legs pinned the offender down by the other three limbs, “You must remain silent and still. You have the privilege of being an offender of Policy 55E.10-Golf and hereby have given up any rights; those paid for or due by your citizenship grade and/or grades.”

The man growled, too stimmed to feel pain, “Fuck you! I got papers from generations ago that I own this land! Screw your damned Policy and the whole book under it!” A tiny spider-bot crawled out of the man’s chest pocket. He was wearing a one-piece flight-suit in a dark gray-blue cloth. The spider skittered down the man’s body and seated itself into a small output terminal at the stomach of the suit.

Gina’s eyes went wide and her third leg kicked at the spider-bot with precise urgency. It missed, the spider ducking into the suit’s connection port too quickly. The P.E. blinked to snap a photo before she turned to run.

Over their comms Gina was calmly reciting a procedural tactic number and sub-note. Jake took a moment to think back to training, “Tactical Response Alpha, Condition B… Ah yeah.”

Landing next to his boss, the two enforcers crouched and readied for crowd control. A long-handled weapon with a smooth spherical end, it was often used to pacify people if they wouldn’t come along quietly. It was nonlethal but gave a headache.

Both officers set theirs to max, jerking the trigger to spread its effects on the nearest pedestrians. Behind them, the spider-bot glowed red and began burrowing through skin. The man began to convulse, beating his chest and screaming.

The explosion was mostly gore, yet the burst had a purpose outside of immediate concussive damage. At the core of the man’s now-pulped body, the spider-bot’s brain sent rapid burst transmissions on a temporary array-antenna of metallic particles formed by and riding the blast. Shrapnel embedded itself in the walls of buildings or on the exteriors of cars and busses.

Gina stood and helped Jake up in one motion, growling at the situation, “So much for stopping the shit from hitting the fan. That manifesto is gonna be on the net for weeks.”

Jake twisted his helmet’s seal tight yet again, shrugging, “Well at least we stopped him.”