Tag Archives: serials

JukePop Serial Review: Silas Merryweather and the Bottomless Sky

Silas Merryweather and the Bottomless Sky is a story written by Joan Albright that introduces the reader to a kid named Silas that’s afraid of heights. This would be a mild inconvenience to the average person but in this world it becomes slightly more horrible. You see, Silas lives on a floating island.

Surefire ways to hook a reader include giving them a flash of action, introducing them to interesting characters, and creating a world that’s easy to fall into. Silas Merryweather and the Bottomless Sky did all three and made me fall right away. It’s incredibly engaging with its quick pace and a good sense of adventure from the start.

It begins with two distinct characters taking on an everyday task that is anything but ordinary: checking the links of chains that tether floating islands. That alone is a lovely idea: Floating islands in a world without a bottom or top? Chains that somehow keep everything knitted together? Sky-skiffs and magnet guns that allow this world’s people to zoom through the air? I love the ideas and the mental images that come with this story and the two characters that first inhabit its lofty islands. Silas and the intractable Windy are at odds since the first page yet seem destined to crash together repeatedly.

Solid writing makes for an easy read through succinct descriptions and entertaining banter, providing a story that really feeds the imagination without bogging down a reader. At times I do wish there was something more in the way of description. I end up wanting to know more about the world than is offered. Understandably you want the reader to be hooked into learning more, but then it has to be a balance with gradual sips of the setting’s Kool-Aid. Though caught up to the serial I have yet to get as many answers as I’d like, but maybe that’s just me being impatient.

Additionally, the story tends toward character development in a way that makes me think of cartoons and Disney sitcoms. Reading Silas makes me picture something like a Ghibli film where the people are all characters in their own right, not just people but unique textures in themselves. That’s not always a bad thing but I do end up wanting more from the people as I don’t have the rich visuals to complete the narrative for me. Instead of feeling real the inhabitants come off as just a tad shallow. Some of the adults especially remind me of stereotypes rather than parts of the world and that makes it harder for me to care what they think or say. Their weakness reduces the main characters a bit and reduces their struggles as well.

That said, it’s still a really enjoyable read and there weren’t even any typos or errors that I had noticed.

One star for clarity and readability, one for originality and interest, half for setting and cohesiveness, half for character development, and one star for enjoyability.

 

Any thoughts or disputes? Please let me know!

-J.A.